LETTER: Confidence lost in coalition parties

The £120bn ‘black hole’ identified by Giles Goodall, in his letter in the County Times (May 16), seems to have been derived by taking the total cost of phased-in tax cuts in one lump, whilst ignoring UKIP’s detailed list of spending cuts.

Indeed, by reducing the net cost of EU membership (as the Swiss identified in 2006) we could provide even more financial benefits and we could eliminate a black hole.

Many career politicians have limited experience with the real world and were selected according to background or PC factors, rather than by their proven ability. UKIP on the other hand seeks candidates, who have succeeded in the real world.

Since Mr Goodall throws doubt on UKIP members’ knowledge of how local communities tick, it is difficult to understand why he wants to increase the involvement of UKIP members!

We have not seen any of his members take up residents’ concerns about speculative development applications that threaten our beautiful countryside, perhaps because that might mean criticising his government and many of his party would be only too ready to support an increase in council tax. They clearly have something to learn about how communities tick!

UKIP’s MEPs were elected in the hope of a return to democracy and it is not surprising that they tend not to sit on endless EU committees tinkering with bureaucracy.

That does of course affect both their ‘attendance’ and expense records.

Over the years our schools have suffered too much from being ‘run’ by Government. We now need to leave professionals to manage with minimal interference and targets.

A voucher system would also offer choice and benefits of competition to parents and children in the state sector, as is currently available for independent schools.

Since the Lib Dem and Tory votes fell by around 60 per cent and 40 per cent respectively between the 2009 and 2013 county council elections, whilst UKIP’s increased by 170 per cent, we might assume that voters have lost confidence in the coalition parties.

Rather than seeking to pick holes in others, Mr Goodall might be better to start by questioning the reason for his party’s failure.

ROGER J. ARTHUR

(UKIP) Horsham district councillor for Chanctonbury ward, North Street, Horsham