VIDEO: Busy afternoon at Shoreham’s Prince Philip Lock

IT was a busy afternoon at Prince Philip Lock in Shoreham Harbour yesterday, with several commercial vessels passing through at high tide.

Our video shows the Milady, registered in Gibraltar, leaving the harbour with its cargo of recycled glass, heading for Portugal.

S33073H13 The Milady, registered in Gibraltar, leaving the harbour with its cargo of recycled glass

S33073H13 The Milady, registered in Gibraltar, leaving the harbour with its cargo of recycled glass

Shoreham Port development director Peter Davies can be heard on the video, explaining the movement of the ships.

Prince Philip Lock usually opens for outward-bound vessels on each hour and for inward-bound vessels on each half-hour around the clock.

Yesterday, the loaded Milady was followed swiftly by the Lady Anneke, the second in a series of 3700tdw vessels launched for Wijnne Barends.

Shoreham Port is the largest timber handling port on the south coast and the ship’s cargo of timber had just been unloaded at the warehouse.

In between the two larger ships, the much smaller Valkyrie used the lock to enter the harbour, following a day’s fishing off Brighton pier.

You can also see Shoreham Port’s pilot boat heading out. It is off to collect the pilot from the Milady.

The port provides a team of four pilots to secure the safety of ships navigating into and out of the Port.

Pilots will normally board incoming vessels in an area up to two nautical miles south of the harbour entrance.

On outgoing vessels, the pilots usually disembark when a vessel is safely clear of the harbour entrance, using a pilot ladder rigged about a metre from the water.

Meanwhile, the Prince George Lock, used for recreational vessels, was also enjoying a busy afternoon as people arrived in the sunny afternoon weather.

Among the smaller boats was the Drum of Drake from Holland, based on vessels from the time of Sir Francis Drake.

Shoreham Harbour Radio, situated on the middle island between the Prince Philip and Prince George locks, is manned 24 hours a day. It is the first point of contact for all vessels using the harbour.