Sowing the seeds (and 3,000 bulbs) of a flowery spring time

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How long does it take to plant 3,000 bulbs? Well, in the case of the volunteers at Worth Park it took just under an hour!

Local residents, together with members of the Friends of Worth Park, planted 2,000 British native species daffodils and 1,000 English bluebells along either side of the footpath in the woodland at the back of the lake at Worth Park.

jpco-20-11-13  Residents, school children, community volunteers and council staff join forces on Tuesday 12 November to plant wild flowers in Worth Park, Pound Hill. (Pic by Jon Rigby)

jpco-20-11-13 Residents, school children, community volunteers and council staff join forces on Tuesday 12 November to plant wild flowers in Worth Park, Pound Hill. (Pic by Jon Rigby)

This area is currently closed to the public while construction works to the lake area are being carried out so we had to get special permission to enter the site to plant the bulbs.

We wanted to plant at this time so that there will be a lovely show in the spring when the lake works are finished and the area is open to the public again.

Later in the day children from Milton Mount Primary School joined in the planting extravaganza by planting more daffodils and a host of wildflowers in the same area.

The children were fascinated by the names of some of the wildflowers and have vowed to do some research to see if they can come up with the answer as to why Hedge Woundwort is called what it is.

jpco-20-11-13  Residents, school children, community volunteers and council staff join forces on Tuesday 12 November to plant wild flowers in Worth Park, Pound Hill. (Pic by Jon Rigby)

jpco-20-11-13 Residents, school children, community volunteers and council staff join forces on Tuesday 12 November to plant wild flowers in Worth Park, Pound Hill. (Pic by Jon Rigby)

There were some other weird and wonderful names as well such as Greater Stitchwort, Sanicle, Hairy Woodrush and Yellow Pimpernel together with the wonderfully named Enchanters Nightshade.

The children thought the names reminded them of witches spells and sounded “really old”.

The mix of some 13 different varieties of wildflowers was specially chosen to suit a shady spot so should do really well in the woodland.

They were also chosen as nectar and food source plants for various moths and caterpillars, therefore increasing the biodiversity of the area which has Site of Nature 
Conservation Importance status.

jpco-20-11-13  Residents, school children, community volunteers and council staff join forces on Tuesday 12 November to plant wild flowers in Worth Park, Pound Hill. (Pic by Jon Rigby)

jpco-20-11-13 Residents, school children, community volunteers and council staff join forces on Tuesday 12 November to plant wild flowers in Worth Park, Pound Hill. (Pic by Jon Rigby)

Children from Milton Mount Primary School also visited the park later in the week to plant some more bluebells and to create some Rangoli patterns.

Rangoli is a form of folk art from India usually created during Diwali but also in other Hindu Festivals.

The ancient symbols have been passed down through the ages, from each generation to the next, keeping both the art form and the tradition alive.

The children had great fun creating some Rangoli patterns from things they found in the woodland such as leaves and sticks to create the patterns.