Magazine: Taking a holiday to fix your problem marriage could make it worse

Couples embarking on ‘make-or-break’ holidays are more likely to split up than stay together, according to a new report.

Instead of salvaging a floundering relationship, six out of ten couples who have booked a break amid a rough patch have found that it didn’t work.

Taking a holiday to fix your problem marriage could make it worse

Taking a holiday to fix your problem marriage could make it worse

While nearly one in ten said that it prompted their divorce.

A survey of 2,128 married and divorced Brits by family law firm Slater & Gordon revealed that despite getting away from every day pressures, ‘make or break’ holidays often actually caused couples to argue more.

The survey revealed that going on a summer holiday is often the last ditch attempt for many couples in crisis before heading to the divorce courts.

Almost a third of Brits believed a holiday was a key test for a struggling relationship with nearly 40 per cent admitting having gone on a holiday in an attempt to breathe new life into their marriage

Many couples thought it would be a good opportunity to connect or would give them a chance to escape the pressures of day to day life and help them fall back in love.

But in reality, hopes of reigniting their love quickly faded, with 40 per cent of Brits thinking that holidays put a strain on their relationship and 28 per cent of Brits claimed they split up with someone on holiday.

Nearly a third (27%) of divorced Brits said they decided to split for good within weeks of returning from a disastrous holiday.

Most popular month for couples to decide to divorce is September with most filing proceedings either immediately or first thing in the New Year.

But it was not all doom and gloom, with 36 per cent saying that the holiday saved their marriage.