Forest supports pupils and parents as they plan for their future

Post 16 Information Evening
Post 16 Information Evening

The range of options available to young people reaching the end of secondary school and the choice of routes into university and higher education were the key messages of the Post 16 Education and Training Information Evening held at the Forest School recently.

Now in its third year, the event once again proved very popular with standing room only in the Main Hall during talks by four external speakers, each of whom presented a brief overview of the different Post 16 options available. Steve Martell from The College of Richard Collyer spoke about the A Level route; Alison White of Central Sussex College represented the vocational college option and Gill Timlett of Apprenticeships in Sussex introduced apprenticeships and work related learning. Finally Lorna Stevenson from St John’s College Oxford University provided an overview of what universities are looking for in applicants and the importance of appropriate post 16 choices.

Pupils and parents were then free to walk around the stands talking directly to the exhibitors. These included local school 6th forms, several vocational colleges, apprenticeship training providers and representatives of the armed forces. “We were extremely pleased by the level of external support. We were fortunate to have in attendance an excellent cross section of education and training providers representing the diversity of opportunities available to pupils at the age of 16 and beyond,” commented organiser Helen Mallows.

Senior Assistant Head Mark England added: “Young people face a challenging future as economic conditions remain uncertain and the cost of higher education increases for students. At the same time education and training choices are continually changing and growing. Given these circumstances it is more important than ever that we support our pupils to make informed choices at this key transitional stage in their learning.”

Copy and picture submitted by The Forest School