Father’s charity CD highlights epilepsy

Alan Jenkins on the cover The Last Time and, below, his daughter Sarah a few months before she died

Alan Jenkins on the cover The Last Time and, below, his daughter Sarah a few months before she died

0
Have your say

MUSIC in memory of his daughter is being used by a Southwick father to raise money for charity.

Alan Dempster Jenkins has been hitting the high notes again to help people with epilepsy, the condition which caused the death of his daughter, Sarah, at the age of 30.

Alan Jenkins' daughter Sarah a few months before she died

Alan Jenkins' daughter Sarah a few months before she died

Mr Jenkins, of Manor Hall Road, has produced a CD nearly every year since his daughter died following a seizure in April 2003.

The Last Time is his sixth CD, recorded to raise money for Epilepsy Society in memory of Sarah.

“I know the devastating effects that epilepsy can have on a family,” he explained.

“Singing, recording and selling my CDs is one of the ways I can do my bit to help.”

This latest CD, which has already raised money for the charity, includes songs such as Have I Told You Lately That I Love You, These Are the Days of Our Lives, You’ve Got a Friend and several acoustic versions of classic Beatles songs, including Here, There and Everywhere and And I Love Her.

Mr Jenkins added: “It’s all a bit of fun really, but the CD has been made and produced by my friend, Mark Turner, in his recording studio and is quite professional, even though I say so myself.”

To order a copy, send a cheque for £6 (which includes postage and packing) to Alan Dempster Jenkins at 141 Manor Hall Road, Southwick.

A campaign to get people talking about epilepsy was launched by the society for National Epilepsy Week, which ended on May 24.

Expert Dr Sallie Baxendale backed the campaign, which aims to highlight the misconceptions that still surround the neurological condition.

Dr Baxendale, consultant neuropsychologist at Epilepsy Society, said: “Once you start talking about epilepsy, it’s amazing how many people know someone with the condition.

“Greater public awareness is one of the biggest issues for people living with the condition. Busting the myths and misconceptions will help banish the stigma people with epilepsy often experience.”

The campaign, Everyone Knows Someone, is designed to help understanding and reduce the stigma faced by more than half a million children and adults living with the condition.

Visit www.epilepsysociety.org.uk or telephone 01494 601400 for more information.