Durrington development could extend to 1,000 homes

The latest plans for the West Durrington development, which will extend the under-construction development from 700 to 1,000 homes SUS-150810-120603001

The latest plans for the West Durrington development, which will extend the under-construction development from 700 to 1,000 homes SUS-150810-120603001

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PLANS for 300 homes that will extend the West Durrington development to 1,000 homes were exhibited on Wednesday (September 7).

Construction is underway on the 700-home development but the exhibition was to gather feedback for a northern extension, which will see houses built up to the edge of the A27.

The West Durrington Consortium – made up of Heron, Taylor Wimpey and Persimmon Homes – expect to submit a planning application in early 2016.

Northbrook ward councillor Keith Sunderland, who attended the exhibition at St Symphorians Church, in Durrington Hill, said: “The area has been designated for housing for the past decade so standing against it seems a bit futile.

“The thing that was pleasing about it is that there is £2.4million community infrastructure levy funds available. I am looking around for good ideas how to spend the money, of which around £500,000 needs to be spent locally.

“I’m determined to push through getting solar panels on the south-facing roofs because it seems a missed opportunity otherwise.”

The development will deliver a mix of two, three and four-bedroom homes, with access from Fulbeck Avenue.

A planned community centre, space for a new pre-secondary school and extensions to local medical facilities were agreed as part of the 700-home phase of development.

But Chris Irwin, strategic projects manager at Taylor Wimpey, explained everything had been designed with the principle of the extension in mind.

He said: “What we have contemplated from the outset was this section.

“Given the housing supply issues Worthing has got, it was appropriate to start thinking about this application.”

Mr Irwin said much of the feedback at the exhibition focused around access concerns, with residents fearing the single entry point was insufficient.

But he stated the issue had been ‘thoroughly tested’ and approved by highways engineers.

Vicki Slaughter, of Adur Avenue, said it was ‘disappointing to lose the fields to bricks’ but recognised the pressure the Government was placing on local authorities to build houses.

She is concerned about the impact of development on her daughter, Eloise, who has complex learning difficulties.

“The impact of the development so close to home on her is immeasurable,” she said.

“I am very worried about how she will cope with the noise and general disruption while they are building.”

Residents who missed the exhibition can find out more on the consortium’s website, here